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Virtual Horse Time

Virtual Horse Time

You can cut all the flowers, but you cannot keep Spring from coming.  -Pablo Neruda

Along with many, if not all sports, equestrian sports have been cancelled and come to an abrupt halt.  Institutions that have been consistent and unwavering, put on hold or cancelled.  This includes the FEI World Cup Finals, the Summer Olympics in Tokyo (delayed until 2021), the Kentucky Derby (delayed until September), and of course national and local shows and events for an indefinite amount of time.  Without planning months ahead, many of these events may just not happen this year.

Trail riders pine for spring, summer and fall trail rides at parks around our beautiful state.  Equestrian competitors plan and train all winter to work on their training and competition goals during the short competition season, some to be able to qualify for national and international competitions.  Horse trainers, instructors, boarding facility owners all have a new “temporary” reality.  However you have been affected in your daily life by changes in school, work, finances and health, our sport and hobby outlets are a key part of our overall wellbeing.

We all have different realities right now spending time with our horses.  Those that have horses at home may be able to get more time in with their horses than they typically do.  If your horse is boarded and your barn is shut down to boarders, the restrictions cannot be lifted soon enough.  Some barns have put in place online schedules to keep no more than a few people on the property at a time, following strict physical distancing and cleaning procedures for shared fixtures and equipment. 

Thankfully, no matter what, spring is still coming!  Here are some ideas to keep yourselves and/or your horses healthy and happy during this time. 

Ruby & Summer enjoying a mountain spring

Horseless?  If you are not able to see your horse right now, review last year, what do you want to accomplish this year (just getting to see your horse!)?  How can you take steps toward accomplishing those goals?  Use this time as a reset, a complete change from routine and a time to reevaluate from the bottom up.  TheVirtualEquestrian.com has an extensive list of courses you can take with a wide variety of disciplines and areas of interest, including therapeutic riding.  Keep yourself fit so you are ready when you can start riding again.  Go to YouTube and learn how to teach your horse a new skill like bowing, Spanish walk or laying down.  Check the #HomeWithHorses movement started by US Equestrian (USEF) with videos and content to keep you learning and inspired.

Horse at home or able to schedule horse time at your boarding facility?  This may be the most ideal situation right now.  Ride in your neighborhood, on your property or take a short trailer ride to a local park.  According to Jeffco Open Space, peak times to avoid are 9:30am-2pm.

Research the discipline organizations you are a member of to see what online resources they offer.  Some trainers have had virtual training platforms in place for years.  In one type, you pay the trainer to evaluate a video of your ride after you have shared it with them.  There are also personal auto-follow cameras, like PIXIO, where trainers can give you real instruction almost like they were there with you.  Many have a training certification programs you can work to progress through the levels by working on certain skills and then you submit a video of you and your horse doing those skills for approval to pass the level. 

Check out a few of these to get you started: 

Trainmedo.com

EquiFITT.com

CRKTrainingVideos.com

ParelliSavvyClub.com

WarwickSchiller.com

Art2Ride.com

TakeLessons.com

There are also some newer website platforms getting going where you can submit a video of you doing a specific Dressage test, Jumping course, Western Riding or Reining Pattern, etc., and get a certified judges feedback or even enter a “class” to compete with other riders doing the same thing.  The one that includes the most disciplines I have seen so far is HorseShowChallenge.com.  There is also a Facebook group called “The Quarantine Classic” that is providing a show type platform.  These sites don’t just keep us riding, competing and working on our goals, they are able to provide income for judges, show organizers and even show announcers. 

The hope of spring is here and not even COVID-19 can stop it!  Hold on to the connection with your horse and nature.  Reform your goals and time with your horse into new and motivating objectives.   Keep moving forward!  Heather McWilliams © 2020

Seeking to Save the Jeffco Fairgrounds

The threat of the closing of the Jeffco Fairgrounds came as quite a shock to the local community when it was announced mid-January that the County Commissioners had abruptly decided to close the entire facility in order to cut the budget. After what was described by opponents as “a sweeping override of existing County revenue limits that will result in a higher tax burden for Jeffco property owners and residents”, the admittedly (by proponents) poorly written Ballot Issue 1A to remove the restriction of TABOR (tax payer bill of rights), failed 55% to 45% at the ballot box last November.  Additional county budget cuts included $5 million for the Sheriff’s Office. 

For those unfamiliar, TABOR is an amendment to the Colorado Constitution passed by the voters in 1992. Among its many provisions, TABOR removed from the legislature (and all other levels of state government) the power to enact tax legislation. Instead, it requires any new tax measures to go to a vote of the people. The law also requires that any amount over collected be given back to the tax payers the following year after over collection. Jeffco hasn’t issued TABOR refunds for years, but has used excess tax revenues to reduce mill levies, lowering taxes in the process.

If Ballot Issue 1A had passed, taxpayers would have opted out of TABOR for seven years, allowing Jefferson County to raise property taxes which they presented as a means for the county to get out of debt. The TABOR refund would have gone toward the county budget which they calculate has a $12.5 million dollar budget shortfall.  The Jeffco Fairgrounds currently has $1.8 million dollars in annual operating costs and brings in about $450,000 in revenue. Many previous and current users of the fairgrounds site the high costs to rent the facilities as limiting factors to more use.

This discrepancy between income and operating cost is not unusual at many, if not all of our state’s fairgrounds. Is it a priority of a fairgrounds to be income producing?  Do any of our local parks, recreational fields for sports and open spaces turn a profit?  Of course not, they are there serving the community and the wildlife that call our area home.  Does Denver County look at Washington Park and decide the space and land could make more income for the county if they used the buildings for office space or use the land in ways that assure a profitable ledger?  Of course not, Wash Park is there for the pleasure of anyone who wants to enjoy it and the experience it offers. Our parks and fairgrounds are there for the enhancement of our state and our connection to nature.

One alternative to closing the facility has been to turn the upper area of the fairgrounds with the Event Center indoor arena, rodeo arena, and the Silver Spur outdoor arena over to Open Space to manage.  That is somewhat of a solution, but then there would be no stalls, educational buildings, exhibit halls, etc., to utilize alongside those spaces.  It would seem that the best solution to preserve the fairgrounds for all groups, would be to keep it whole. 

Jeffco Fairgrounds aerial from Denver.org

In response to the potential closing of the fairgrounds, a local group called Friends of the Jeffco Fairgrounds has formed.  Many dedicated people and like-minded organizations have come forward to share their stories and the history intertwining the Jefferson County Fairgrounds and their experiences at local county meetings. The fate of the fairgrounds may feel like a local and isolated issue, but it reflects a more national divide between the urban and rural settings.

Friends of the Fairgrounds seeks to have all groups represented that have utilized the resources at the fairgrounds in the past and present for not only agricultural purposes like 4-H, livestock events, equestrian events (including Westernaires); but also for dog events, gardeners, beekeepers, craft fairs, book fairs, the Jeffco Action Center, Rotary, emergency wildfire evacuation, and sports organizations among others. 

The goal of Friends of the Fairgrounds is to save the fairgrounds for all future generations to have facilities available for the purpose of learning about agriculture and to be an agricultural and equine recreation center for the county.  They plan to offset the operating costs that are not available to government agencies through grants, raised funds and sponsorships.

Friends of the Fairgrounds states:  Agriculture should be accessible to everyone. For some of us it is a livelihood, for others our recreation. For everyone there should be an opportunity for understanding where our food comes from.  Historically, across the country, County Fairgrounds serve as a hub for these activities and a gathering place for the community. This facility is also an essential location for animal and human evacuation in the event of a disaster. Yes, urbanization cannot be denied but neither can urban farming, youth opportunity, equestrian recreation, Colorado heritage and this amazing group of people. We cannot wait on a shifting demographic to consider our interests. Losing the fairgrounds will increase the urban/rural divide that much more.

The Friends of Jeffco Fairgrounds mission:

  1. Operate the facilities of the fairgrounds in Jefferson County, Colorado; easing the burden of county government
  2. Develop educated, open-minded, compassionate and competent youth
  3. Decrease the urban/rural divide
  4. Promote western heritage, accessible agriculture and equestrian activities

What can we do as Jeffco residents to help? 

  • Keep the momentum going to support the fairgrounds in front of the county and show our continued interest in keeping the fairgrounds whole and usable.
  • Show up to support any meetings.
  • Reach out to the County Commissioners to show your support of the fairgrounds and its value to the community.
  • Anyone with an interest in the fairgrounds needs to work together as one cohesive group. 
  • If you have legal expertise in non-profits and government or other skills that could be helpful, contact Friends of the Fairgrounds.

Emails for the County Commissioners:

Lizzy Szabo, lszabo@jeffco.us

Casey Tighe, ctighe@jeffco.us

Lindsey Dalkemper, ldahlkem@jeffco.us

Find Friends of the Fairgrounds on Facebook for the latest on meetings, information and contact information or email them at friendsofthefairgrounds@gmail.com.  Heather McWilliams © 2020

We ALL Need Horses – Part 2

Last month we explored the importance of keeping horses woven into the fabric of our daily lives, not just for horse enthusiasts, but for all people to be able to have access to the many therapeutic benefits of being around horses as well as to enjoy them in our landscape.  Horses in our communities gives way to open spaces, aesthetic landscapes and the connection to that wild freedom that all horses have. 

As we discussed last month, we are in a disruption in the horse culture calling for horse people to take a hard look at our current structures and organizations.  Nothing brought the disruption as quickly into the spotlight in the past few weeks as did the potential closing of the Jefferson County Fairgrounds.  The fact is, no matter what the agricultural tradition was in the past in our communities and counties, the voices for the horse and agricultural are in the minority.  The most important question now is, what can we do now to advocate to keep horses in ALL of our lives? 

Get involved with organizations that support the entire horse community like the Jefferson County Horse Council and the Colorado Horse Council (CHC).  The CHC advocates for the social, economic and legislative interests of all horse breeds and people within the State of Colorado, the US and worldwide.  They also put on the annual Rocky Mountain Horse Expo.  An annual membership in organizations like these ensure that the equestrian voice is heard on a larger scale.  Membership in the CHC provides horse owners with a liability insurance, not to mention the ability to get the cool “Support the Horse” license plates!

Additionally, get involved with national and local organizations that support your discipline.  For a nominal fee every year, join that organization annually to help support local events like shows, rides, clinics and other educational opportunities.  Being a member of these groups, whether you ride at one of their events or not, keeps you up to date on what is going on and shows the organization your support.   Or join a local board like the Jeffco Advisory Committee the oversees the Jefferson County Trails to advocate for equestrian use of the trails.

Volunteer for trail stewardship, shows, events, clinics, and expos to keep them viable.  Those on the inside know that these events are not money makers by any means but are there to support horses in general (RM Horse Expo), disciplines or activities in our area.  Not to mention, you will a great time and  meet a lot of great people.  Plus, they are very important gateway events to promote and invite the up and coming horse enthusiasts to.

Show up to ride on the trails and park in the oversized parking spots to show that there is a need for them.  Go to the trail forum meetings put on by Jeffco Open Space for all trail users. Currently, the number of equestrians that show up to have a voice in trail use is about 1-3% of the room full of bikers and hikers.  If we want to be able to continue to ride our horses on the trails, enjoying all of the beauty that surrounds us with them, we need to show that we are interested. 

When on the trails, be an ambassador for ALL trail riders.  Clean up horse poop in the parking lots, keep your dog on a leash and stay on the trails, or if they are muddy, horses and bikers should stay off of them to help sustain the trail condition and prevent erosion.  For up to date trail information, go to:  www.jeffco.us/1531/alerts-closures.  For ideas for trail, arenas and other riding opportunities, go to:  www.jeffcohorse.com/trailsarenas.

Horse ranch in Rural Alberta Canada

Enter trail rides, events, clinics and shows put on by local people and organizations.  Go to the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo coming up February 28-March 1,2020.  For $15 you can spend the entire day with 450+ horses, watching 40+ clinicians and a plethora of disciplines at 7 venues throughout the NW Complex in Denver.  Not to mention the horse vendors, art, and organizations that you can learn about, support and join.  The line up this year is not to be missed, go to www.rockymountainhorseexpo.com for the full schedule. 

If you have horses, invite those horse interested friends or kids you know over just to brush and be around the horses.  Sometimes we forget that you don’t need to ride, just being with horses is a surreal experience. 

Stay Informed and support current issues like the fairgrounds.  There is a website set up for the most current information regarding the Jeffco Fairgrounds at www.jeffcohorse.com/alerts.   Attend the critical meetings.  Regarding the trails, the Jeffco Advisory Committee meets at 6pm on the 1st Thursday of every month at the Jeffco Open Space Admin Offices in Golden.  Sign up for the Jeffco email list to learn about upcoming trail forums at www.Jeffco.us/814/Open-Space. 

It is critical we Work together with ALL horse people to advocateto keep horses in our communities.  One key issue that seems to come up often is the need to collaborate across all disciplines to not schedule over each other’s events.  For example, if there is a local event like a poker ride in your community, it would be short sited to schedule another trail ride, gymkhana or event at the same time.  Plus, the sight of a bunch of friendly equestrians showing up at a trail or event makes an important statement to the public.  This schedule issue begs the need for a statewide horse calendar that would need to be updated by each and every organization, taking some effort, but it would benefit all of them.  Horse people don’t typically have a problem traveling a distance to attend something they are interested in and a general calendar would help everyone bring in more participants and awareness.

Without our own individual and group efforts to advocate for the importance of the horse in our communities, horse people will lose the privilege to ride on public trails, across private lands, access to local boarding facilities, access to public riding facilities and ALL people will lose access to the majestic horse.  What can YOU do to support the horse in our community?  Heather McWilliams © 2020.“When I bestride him, I soar. I am a hawk: he trots the air; the earth sings when he touches it; the basest horn of his hoof is more musical than the pipe of Hermes” — Shakespeare

Heather McWilliams (c) 2020

We ALL Need Horses – Part 1

 “Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here where grace is laced with muscle and strength by gentleness confined.” —Ronald Duncan

Since the beginning of man, any culture that found and tamed horses rode to the front of civilization.  They were faster, could move farther and had the muscle to farm the ground.  The horse was a necessity to life whether you lived in the city or country.  Over time, in civilian life, the automobile and train took the place of the horse.  In farming, the tractor and in the military, tanks and trucks.

Just within the last 50 years, our own mountain community had numerous horse breeding farms, boarding facilities, and horseback riding stables, horses in back yards were commonplace, boarding facilities were thriving with boarders, adults and youngsters eager to be with the horses.  When Troutdale in the Pines was in its hay day, horse races were held on Upper Bear Creek Road.

But there is so much more to horses than their utilitarian uses.  Their majesty, beauty, energy, raw reflection of our own energy, connection to the earth.  As Sharon Ralls Lemon states, “The essential joy of being with horses is that it brings us in contact with the rare elements of grace, beauty, spirit and freedom.”  The truth is, the more technology we have and the more urbanized we become, the more critical it is to have horses woven into the fabric of our communities.  No other domestic animal can instantly transport anyone to the present and wash the rest away. 

As we would expect, the U.S. horse community as a whole has morphed and transformed over time.  Horse people understand the necessity of the horse and they are integrated into their lifestyles.  Although, not everyone understands the important of horses in our communities or economy. 

To understand the impact of the equine industry, the American Horse Council in conjunction with The Innovation Group conducted The 2017 Economic Impact Study of the U.S. Horse Industry.  The $122 billion equine industry is a growing segment of the U.S. economy, employing 1.74 million people,

Grazing horses at sunset, plateau Ukok, the junction of Russian, Mongolian and Chinese boarders

The study found that the care, business and recreation surrounding the 7.2 million horses in the country generated $79 billion in total salaries.  Additionally, around 80 million acres of land is reserved for horse-related activities.  In other words, the horse industry is doing well and has an important impact on our communities.

At the same time though, clubs and organizations are losing members, equine events struggle with volunteers and entries, boarding facilities are being sold or are strained by development and water issues, non-horse people are buying horse properties, trail riding struggles with parking and safety.  We are in a “disruption” of our local horse industry, but the disruption does not have to be a bad thing.  If looked at in the right way, a disruption can cause us to re-evaluate and re-organize our existing systems and transition them to succeed in the current climate.  If we want to keep our local horse facilities – public and private, trail access, and open fields adorned with horses, horse people need to respond to the current disruption and not just realize what we had once it’s gone. 

Having horses in our communities enhances the landscape.  When people come to visit the west, they expect to see broad expanses, blue skies, mountains and horses.  Farms and ranches that keep horses and cattle work to care for and steward the land and create a healthy ecosystem.  Those open spaces increase the value of the homes and communities around them.  Check out and join the Equine Land Conservation Resource (elcr.org) for resources regarding trails and horse community models throughout the U.S.

The economic study also found that 38 million, or 30.5%, of U.S. households contain a horse enthusiast, and 38 percent of participants are under the age of 18.  In a recent study in Colorado, 640,000 people that did not have a horse were interested in having an equine experience.  How do we get horses in front of the 30.5%?

It has been scientifically proven that horses help humans physically, mentally and emotionally.  Equine therapy has become a critical treatment and therapy for PTSD, learning disabilities, physically disabilities, emotional and social learning.  Urban and sub-urban communities must be able to be within reach of horses and horse facilities to utilize the benefits of the horse, not have them crowded out for more houses.

What is it going to take to keep the horse woven into the fabric of our communities?  It will take horse people committing to the horse community to keep it healthy.  Disciplines and riding interests need to be set aside, and horse people need to come together as one united community.  We have to see the big picture of the entire horse community that ultimately affects all of us.  We need to get involved, stay informed and show up.

Come back next month to explore solutions and ways to respond to the horse industry disruption and where we go from here.  Please email me at heather@mtnhomes4horses.com to share your ideas.

Heather McWilliams © 2020

Lizzie Fera and Gigi Conquer the US Dressage Finals in Kentucky

When asked what it was like to be at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington for the US Dressage Finals this November 7-10th, Lizzie explained, “It was definitely overwhelming, I had never been to a show that big. Although, when I got there, it felt magical – probably what it feels like to a kid going to Disneyland!”

After winning the Reserve Championship at the Great American Insurance Group/USDF Region 5 Dressage Championships in Parker, Colorado this past September 19-22 in the Adult Amateur Division, Lizzie and Gigi were nominated to represent Region 5 at Third Level in Kentucky and received a travel grant, helping them professionally ship Gigi to Kentucky and meet her there. 

Although, her journey has been wrought with health challenges, Lizzie (Elizabeth) Fera has had the goal of competing in the US Dressage Finals since they began in 2013.  The 26-year-old mountain area native started having back troubles as a teenager which lead to a diagnosis of Kyphosis at 15 years old.  This required a 10-hour surgery to fuse her spine from T1-T12 with 2 rods and 28 screws.  A year later, the surgeon removed the hardware because her spine was supposed to be fused by then and would hold its own. 

Originally starting in the discipline of Eventing (a horse and rider team triathalon which includes Dressage, Stadium Jumping and Cross Country Jumping), which has a higher rate of injury to riders, the lifelong horse lover had to switch gears to accommodate her back and began to pursue Dressage.  Lizzie did not show for a few years while she healed, but returned to showing as a Young Rider (riders between 16 and 21), winning the 2014 Great American USDF Region 5 Championship at Training Level on her horse Bojangles. 

Due to ringbone, Bojangles was retired from competition, leaving Lizzie without a horse to show for a time until Gigi (Gypsy Rose) a now 15 year old Hanoverian Mare came along.  Gigi was advertised cheap as a broodmare because of an injury and at the time Lizzie and her mom, Kristie Cotton, were looking for a nice mare to have a foal that they could raise and eventually bring up through the levels of Dressage.  Gigi did not hold on to the pregnancy, so they decided they would try to ride her.  Gigi had some significant behavioral issues at the beginning, but fortuitously one of Kristie’s specialties is retraining difficult horses and Gigi was transformed into a kind, hard-working, sound and incredibly successful show partner.

As Gigi and Lizzie progressed, Lizzie felt and could see something was wrong again in her back again, while she also was experiencing significant pain.  Her original surgeon said there was nothing to do, which she accepted for a year and a half until her mom knew they had to get a second opinion.  They found Dr. Evalina Burger at the University of Colorado, one of the top spinal surgeons in the country.  Lizzie was then diagnosed with Scheuermanns disease, a rare disease where your vertebrae form into wedge shapes in the teenage years, creating an unstable spine, causing Kyphosis.  Dr. Burger said without another surgery, she would likely be paralyzed because her T12 vertebrae was rotating and close to compressing her spinal cord. 

Spinal surgery number three was another complicated 10 hour procedure, including 2 weeks in the hospital with 3 blood transfusions.  Now, Lizzie’s entire thoracic vertebrae are fused as well as all but three of her lumbar vertebrae in order to support and stabilize her spine.  After 6 months in a brace, Dr. Burger gave Lizzie the go ahead to ride again.  Right away Lizzie was back on Bojangles, who had brought her through the first two surgeries.  Two weeks later she was back to riding Gigi with the goal to get back to showing. 

Kristie had been training and working with Gigi while Lizzie was healing.  Once the brace was off, Lizzie had just 10 months to prepare for finals.  Lizzie and her husband Michael currently live in Grand Junction where she graduates this month with a degree in Biology from Colorado Mesa University and Michael  graduates with a degree in Geology May 2020.  Lizzie traveled to Evergreen in between studying to train Gigi.  Without the luxury of an indoor arena, Lizzie trained in the early morning, late evenings and rain.  If snow made the footing too slick, “in hand” work (riderless) helped keep Gigi schooled and fit. 

Preparing for something like the US Dressage Finals, requires consistent work for both horse and rider to be fit physically and mentally prepared.  Kristie explains this beautifully: “It is not about repetitive work, it is not about riding the movements the way they should look in the test. The horse needs to understand the comfort of suppleness so they will always seek correctness, not resistance in their work. We train with gymnasticizing strategies that improve balance, strength, and elasticity. It is about creating unity, with the horse becoming completely focused on the quiet dialogue of the rider. (Because of her back) Lizzie can only sit very neutral in the saddle, she cannot influence the horse like other riders. This is actually a good thing as she is not disruptive to the horse with unnecessary body movement. Gigi has to respond with muscle nuance of the rider (sitting taller means go forward, flexing of stomach muscles means rebalance or slow) this creates minimum effort with maximum results. Coaching for shows has to meet the needs of both horse and rider. Assessing the mental and physical obstacles that can appear in the moment, means coming up with the proper remedy. Every horse is a wealth of knowledge as they cannot train in the exact same way, and just like humans, they have good days and bad. Catering to the horses comfort brings valuable success.”

Pain is still a huge daily obstacle for Lizzie, she has learned to listen to her body and rest on tough days, but also learn to emotionally persevere without becoming discouraged. Lizzie states, “Having a bond with a horse and competing in a sport I love is worth it.“ Lizzie is not one to give up.  Her love of Dressage has become more of an art, bringing her deeper into the training and tactics necessary for each part of the test (while showing), while creating a picture of “beauty and harmony.”

Once in Kentucky Lizzie recalls, “There were times I was intimidated, but I’ve been showing for so long and it’s what I really am passionate about.  I think it helped my nerves a lot to just think about that and I just kept telling myself that I qualified to go with my placing and my scores and that I worked really hard to get there.”  Lizzie continued, “I did feel like I belonged (at the finals in Kentucky) actually. Even though I’m from such a small town and I do not have the financials of most people in the sport, Gigi was a great teammate and beautiful horse to bring.  My mom is an amazing trainer and I really wanted to be able to show all that we had been working so hard on!”  Lizzie and Gigi ended up placing 20th out of over 40 horse and rider teams in her division, representing the best Third Level teams in the nation.  Congratulations Lizzie, Gigi and Kristie!                         Heather McWilliams ©2019

Fencing, Pasture & Hay Storage – Horsekeeping Mountain Style

One dream that brings many residents to larger properties in the Foothills is having their horses at home.  The ease of enjoying more time with them by just walking out the door.  If you keep your horses at home in our mountain area, you know that our location does not fit into the average book on “horsekeeping on small acreages”.  Of course, even from property to property the technicalities can vary greatly because of geography, sun exposure, covenants, flora and fauna.  Here are some ideas to consider while you enjoy having your horses at home.

Fencing and Pasture

Fencing is a very broad topic and varies from neighborhood to neighborhood with what the covenants dictate, what the ground will allow and of course what you can afford.  Whatever you do, consider the wildlife that we enjoy and share the mountains with along with your horses.  The Division of Wildlife has a “must read”, excellent brochure on many types of fencing and specifications that work for wildlife and livestock – go to www.wildlife.state.co.us and find “Fencing with Wildlife in Mind”.   In general, elk and deer need to be able to safely jump the fences and calves and fawns need to be able to safely crawl under.

With our arid climate and in order to protect your land from erosion and being picked down to dirt fairly quickly, it is always important to have a sacrifice area, lot or runs to keep your horses off of a larger turn-out area for periods of time.  Maybe you only have enough for a small lot, but if you have an area that is larger, it is worth some cross fencing to allow a little grass to grow for your horse to enjoy and feel like a horse.  In order to preserve the beauty and integrity of your property, see the past article called, Pasture Track System at https://mtnhomes4horses.com/track-system/

The fencing on your lot or runs should be made of very safe, secure and sturdy materials since the horses will be in there for longer periods of time and will likely be using it for itching, leaning, and reaching.  Other things to consider are the level and space between the fence to prevent a leg, head or other body part from being stuck or rubbing their mane out. 

Horse and Elk visiting over a zig zag fence

For fencing materials, there are many options that can be aesthetically pleasing and fairly inexpensive to obtain.  Look for local resources that are readily available to save money on the freight and materials.  Beetle kill wood is one example of this in Colorado, whereas in Texas it may be pipe and cable.   One application is “Zig Zag” or “Worm” Fencing that uses long straight trees, is attractive, requires no post holes, is relatively easy to install and if you or someone you know is mitigating Lodgepole Pine off of their property, it can be quite inexpensive or even free.

For the majority of the properties up here, there is just not any way to get around feeding horses some amount of hay year round.  Our grass is not the type and just does not get enough moisture in our semi-arid climate to recover that quickly.  There are a few properties that can and the rest of us suffer from pasture envy.  Our local “stocking rates” are on average around one 1,000 pound horse per 30 acres of dry pasture, but a water source can improve that number.   Using rotational grazing by cross fencing sections or cells of your pasture will increase the grass production and pasture health, but not your stocking rates.  The principle used on local land is called “take half, leave half”- Your horses eat down half of the forage and then you remove them from that portion for about 30 days to let it recover.   Many people in our area limit the pasture turn-out time of their horses to a number of hours that works for them, their land and grasses.  One disadvantage of this is that the horses may only eat one type, their favorite type of grass during that period, making the recovery for that grass difficult.  It is important to mention that when your pasture or lot has trees in it, it critical for the horses safety to trim any dead branches off from ground level to a couple feet above their eye level to keep them from poking eyes, legs and other body parts.  The Small Acreage Management Team at the Colorado State University Extension Service will come evaluate your property at no cost and determine the number of grazing days for your animals and property (720-634-3927, more resources for managing small acreages at www.ext.colostate.edu ).

Hay Storage

Hay Storage and fencing can be related if you don’t have a place in your barn or a hay barn to keep it from other hungry hooved animals.  If elk and deer get into your hay, it is not only costly to you, it is not good for them.   Refer again to the above DOW brochure on “Fencing with Wildlife in Mind” for great hay storage solutions.  Some options include fencing in a storage area that must be 7-8 feet high to keep elk and deer from jumping in.  Panels, similar to large wooden pallets, are also functional and can be moved around to different locations.  While in use, the slats on the panels should be vertical to prevent them from being climbed and also secured together to create a complete barrier.   Of course, hay should be kept securely tarped (remember the wind!) and off of the ground.

Keeping horses at home can be very rewarding for owners by enjoying the ability to feed, care for, ride and manage their horses themselves.  Putting some thought into your individual property, its strengths, weaknesses and how to keep it aesthetically beautiful for years to come, with the native wildlife in mind, benefits our community as a whole and ensures your properties value for years to come.  

Heather McWilliams © 2019

Poker Ride October 26th 2019!

It is time for one the areas most popular horse events of the year, the Intermountain Horse Association (IHA) Poker Ride.  This year, IHA is teaming up with the Buffalo Bill Saddle Club (BBSC) and proceeds will benefit Harmony Equine Center in Franktown, Colorado.

Harmony Equine Center is located on a beautiful, pastoral property along Highway 86 in Franktown, Colorado and is the equine division of the Denver Dumb Friends League.  So far this year, they have been given more than 225 starved horses by law enforcement.  They believe that communities are now recognizing vulnerable and at-risk horses and are reporting this type of neglect, bringing Harmony more horses than ever.  For more information and for specific stories on rescued horses, go to harmonyequinecenter.org/.

As with all equine events this summer, Vesicular Stomatitis (VSV) is a big concern and Aspen Creek Veterinary Hospital of Conifer, Colorado will be on site to check all horses before they are unloaded from the trailer.  It is thought and certainly hoped by the horse and veterinary communities, that the virus will be waning by time of the Poker Ride. 

The Poker Ride is open to the public and family friendly for all ages of riders.  People are also welcome to lead horses and or ponies. If you have not been to a Poker Ride before, it is a fun way to spend a fall morning with your friends and horses.  

Here is how it works: participants ride their horses to 5 stations along the designated trail.  At each station, riders will pick a playing card and a station volunteer will record it on their card received at registration.  Once all riders are back to the finish point, the winning hands will be determined.  Next the participants select a prize from an array of horse related merchandise. Best hand picks first, the second-best hand picks second and so on until every participant gets a prize.  Of course, you must be present to select a prize. Lunch will be served at the finish for all participants. 

Poker Ride map – stations in pink

As in years past, the Poker Ride will be held at Alderfer Three Sisters Open Space Park at 30357 Buffalo Park Road Evergreen Colorado.  The trails vary from sandy to rocky, so it is recommended that horses are shod or have trail boots.  There are three route options to choose from that coincide with the card stations: 

  * SHORT 3.4 miles about 1.5 hours

  * MEDIUM 4.66 miles about 2 hours

  * LONG 5.85 miles about 3 hours

Riders start at their discretion, leaving no later than 11 am.  Everyone must be back by noon and out of the parking area by 2pm.  There is no public water available, therefore please bring water for yourself and your horse. 

Registration Fees:

  • Single adult $45
  • Senior age 65 and up $35
  • Minor under 18 must be accompanied by adult or senior $20
  • Family – up to 2 adults and 2 youths $100
  • Lunch only $10 for non-riders
  • Buy an extra card to replace your worst card – One per rider $10
  • Sponsorship $75 individuals and businesses

Saturday October 26th:

  • Gate opens 8:00 am
  • Onsite registration begins 8:00 am
  • Ride begins 9:00 am
  • Last rider out 11:00 am
  • All riders return cards 12:00 noon
  • Lunch 12:00 noon
  • All vehicles out of the parking area 2:00pm

You will be able to register using our online store as well as in person.  Online registration at bbscgolden.org/Poker_Ride OPEN NOW and is HIGHLY recommended.   When you open the store please scroll down the page to see the registration choices and sponsorship and the option to make an additional donation.  IN ORDER TO HELP PLAN ONSITE PARKING, PLEASE TRAILER POOL IF POSSIBLE AND REGISTER ASAP!

For more information on the Poker Ride and other BBSC events, go to www.bbscgolden.org.  The Buffalo Bill Saddle Club was founded in 1947 and is dedicated to preserving and promoting our Western heritage through family-oriented activities with our horse companions.  They accomplish this through trail riding (day rides and overnight camping rides), monthly meetings, parades, social events and two Gymkhanas.  The fall Gymkhana will be on September 15th at Indiana Equestrian Center in Arvada, Colorado.

Heather McWilliams © 2019

World Champion on a Whim!

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity – Seneca

Not exactly a whim, as Kathy Laskye has been learning and preparing for this moment for the last eight years. 

Kathy was born a “horse girl” and grew up on a dairy farm in northwest Illinois.  She started with a Shetland pony, then spent her school years competing at local county fairs in Western Pleasure and Horsemanship.  When she headed off to college, her “horse bug” was put on hold for many years. 

In 2011 Kathy decided she “wasn’t getting any younger” and bought a Paint gelding to start riding again.  Her initial intentions were to simply reconnect with her horse roots and trail ride until she stumbled upon Evergreen Ranch Sorting Association (ERSA).  Kathy had never worked cattle before, but thought it looked like fun, not to mention the people at ERSA were welcoming and easy going, creating an ideal learning environment – Kathy was hooked! 

Kathy explains, “the beautiful thing about ranch sorting is all you need is a horse that is interested in cattle. Again, I started on a Paint gelding who wasn’t ‘cow bred’ but he was a willing participant and we learned together.  A year after I joined ERSA and became a true addict, I decided to give the competitive arena a whirl and in 2013 I won the Colorado State Championship with RSNC (Ranch Sorting National Championship) Beginner Division.”

RSNC is the National Association based out of Wellington, CO which promotes ranch sorting all across the country. RSNC was started with the intent to preserve the heritage and integrity of the ranching lifestyle while providing a family oriented, competitive riding experience at the grassroots level. Created for all levels of ranch sorting enthusiasts, RSNC has divisions available for beginners all the way to professionals.  Everyone can compete at their comfort level and gain confidence along the way.

Through the support and encouragement of her friends, Kathy took her first try at the Cinch RSNC World Finals in Fort Worth, Texas in 2016.  Kathy reports, “I didn’t place nor even make any cuts, but what an experience it was to watch what a true cow horse and rider can do!  That 1st World Finals experience sealed the deal and I was all in!”

As she continued on with ERSA and RSNC competitions, Kathy’s new desire to really hone her skills and knowledge led her to further her horsemanship and reading cattle skills by working with Cole Piotrowski (Evergreen trainer and multi-World Finals winner) as well as Wolfe Cowhorse trainers, Jessie & Logan Wolfe.  Kathy also found Honey, a ‘cow bred’ mare who she could partner with to compete at the higher levels, adding Kat to her string this past April. 

Honey, Kathy and Kat

After several more years of competing regionally with RSNC Kathy and Honey won the 2017 Colorado State Finals in the Rookie Division and attended several more World Finals down in Ft. Worth.  Each year learning something new to take back home and work on.

At the beginning of 2019, Kathy thought she might take a break, still ranch sort, but not as much and maybe even skip the CINCH RSNC World Finals in Fort Worth this year that she had attended the last 4 years.  Fast forward to June.  Kathy explains, “of course, peer pressure played into my decision and away I went!  I’ve met so many wonderful people over the years that I wanted to see again in Fort Worth and there was a great crew headed down from Colorado/Wyoming.”

The CINCH RSNC World Finals is a 7-day show with numerous classes and divisions running all week long.  Classes can range from 100 – 600+ teams. The week kicks off with the Western Heritage division. Western Heritage classes are designed for the team to work the cattle in a quiet, more authentic ranch sorting style.  There are no loud noises to scare them away from the gate; there is no loping into the pen to move the cow quickly.

Kathy rode in the Western Heritage class with another competitor from Parker, CO, Tanner Sperle.  Tanner and Kathy have competed together as a team for several years and know each other’s style and strengths.  After making the final cut to the Top 10, they were in the finals!  Luckily, they were called out to sort in the #10 spot, giving them the advantage of knowing exactly what cow they were to cut 1st and exactly how many cattle we needed to be World Champions and they DID IT!  Kathy also rode another class of Western Heritage with a dear friend from South Carolina, Beth Lindler, where they finished 5th in the World.  The combination of both of those class finishes put her in the High Point position at the end of the day to win the World Championship saddle!

The courage to act on that whim and head back to Fort Worth brought all of Kathy’s preparation and learning together, giving her the opportunity to run into that “luck”, accomplishing a long time goal – Congratulations Kathy and Kat!  For more information:  RSNC https://www.rsnc.us/ and find ERSA on Facebook under Evergreen Ranch Sorting Association. Heather McWilliams (c) 2019

The Story of Oliver

From the moment Oliver was placed in his spot at the southeast corner of Evergreen Parkway and Stagecoach Blvd, he became a popular community icon.  Carefully woven from wire and painted to withstand the elements, Oliver was created by Jeff Best of Devil’s Rope Studio in Clare, Michigan (www.devilsropestudio.com). 

In 2016, Jeff Best received a call from a gentleman who had seen his barbed wire draft horses on display in the city of Mt Pleasant, Michigan for an art competition.  The gentleman asked if Jeff could make a full-size Friesian that looked like his wife’s horse Oliver to give to her as a Christmas present.  With that, Oliver was born.  With their permission to use the name Oliver, Jeff created a brother Oliver who traveled 1400 miles in the Spring of 2018 to his new home for the year in Evergreen, Colorado. 

Not long after, Oliver’s popularity reached back to Jeff in Michigan.  Jeff explains, “In the fall of 2018, I was competing in an art competition in Grand Rapids Michigan called Art Prize 10.  This is an international art competition that attracts hundreds of thousands of art enthusiasts from all over the country.  I typically stay with my piece during the three-week exhibition, so I talk to many, many people during my stay.  One particular day I was talking to a person that asked me if I made anything but wildlife. I responded that I indeed did and had a large Friesian horse in Evergreen, Colorado.  Just at that moment a lady just happened by and overheard the conversation.  She said… ‘is that horse you speak of named Oliver?’   I responded with I’m sure a perplexed look, ‘why yes, it is’.  She continued, ‘I’m from Evergreen and I drive by Oliver every day as I head to work’.   What are the chances that this lady would be walking by me just as I talked about a horse sculpture I made in Evergreen and then know the sculptures name while being 1400 miles from home?  It was a pretty amazing event for me and warmed my heart thinking of the wide influence Oliver has had in such a short period of time.“

According to Dale Glover of Sculpture Evergreen, Oliver was originally brought to Evergreen as one of the temporary pieces for Sculpture Evergreen’s annual sculpture walk. Most temporary pieces stay in place for one year, from June 1st to June 1st. Since 2019 is the 25th anniversary year of Sculpture Evergreen, they had a goal of increasing awareness of the organization in the Evergreen community. They picked Oliver as the symbol of the anniversary celebration because of his prominent location.

Next the fundraising effort was kicked off in January 2019 to purchase Oliver and add him to the permanent collection, now at 37 pieces around Evergreen. The fundraising effort for Oliver was a little too successful and didn’t allow much time for promotion, raising the funds in about 3 weeks!  In addition to the purchase of Oliver, they budgeted for the improvement of the site that will be completed in late June. 

In order to continue the promotion of Sculpture Evergreen and celebrate their 25th year, Jeff Best delivered a Baby Oliver to Evergreen the first weekend of June.  This new 6′ tall Baby Oliver (the original Oliver is 8’) will be raffled off by Sculpture Evergreen throughout the summer at the Lake Concerts, Evergreen Rodeo, Summerfest, Evergreen Fine Arts Festival and a few other events. Baby Oliver will be at each of those events, so people can stop by their booth, check him out, and buy tickets! Tickets are $25 or 5 for $100. The drawing will be held at the Boogie at the Barn October 25th, but ticket buyers do not need to be present to win.  Funds raised will be used to continue expanding the collection of outdoor sculpture throughout the Evergreen community.  You can also contact Dale Glover directly for tickets at dalehglover@yahoo.com or call 425-260-9399.

Oliver is just one of the many sculptures around town that is a part of the Sculpture Walk created by Sculpture Evergreen in 1999.  This yearly competition brings a lively diversity of high-quality sculpture to the mountain area. Artwork is selected from many submissions and then loaned to Sculpture Evergreen for a year. Each of the artists whose work is selected is paid an honorarium and awards are given to those voted by the public as the favorites.

A trail map showing the locations of the permanent sculptures and Sculpture Walk art is produced each year and widely distributed throughout the greater Evergreen area. A map of the sculptures is also available at www.sculptureevergreen.org.  The “Guide by Cell” feature enables viewers to use their cell phone for a self-guided tour.  Each sculpture has a plaque with the Guide by Cell number (303-562-0435), and the sculptures unique number. The tour provides a narrative about each sculpture, the artist’s inspiration, what to look for and why.

Each of the sculptures is for sale, and some have become part of the permanent collection, thanks to donations from individuals, grants from the (SCFD) and Colorado Creative Industries (CCI) and others. Sculpture Evergreen is also indebted to the generous property owners who allow sculptures to be placed in accessible and scenic locations throughout the community.  Oliver found his prominent spot when Andrew McWilliams, Managing Broker and part owner of RE/MAX Alliance Evergreen and Conifer recognized the potential of the location and contacted Sculpture Evergreen about using it for an installation. 

In addition to Baby Oliver, Jeff Best delivered a Bugling Elk that is now located at the Lutheran Church on Meadow Drive.   He stated, “I’m so blessed to be selected to come back to Evergreen once again this year.  Bringing Baby Oliver and well as a large Bugling Elk.  Evergreen has been very good for me and my work at Devils Rope Studio.  I’m a truly blessed man.” 

Look for opportunities throughout the summer to buy tickets and own your own Oliver!

Heather McWilliams © 2019

Evergreen Rodeo Weekend! Featuring the Evergreen Rodeo Drill Team, Rocky Mountain Renegades!

Let the fun begin! – Father’s Day Weekend and Evergreen Rodeo Weekend are synonymous in Evergreen Colorado.  Having a rodeo in a small town is a historical and special privilege, not to mention a PRCA (Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association) Rodeo.  Being a PRCA Rodeo holds the standards of animal treatment and care to the highest level. 

The PRCA has more than 60 rules to ensure the proper care and treatment of rodeo performance animals.  The rules and regulations are detailed and include important measures such as on-site veterinarians, animal inspections, type of equipment used, treatment of animals, shipping, frequency of activity, and the list goes on. 

Impromptu Evergreen rodeos started in the early 1900’s to entertain locals, celebrity visitors and affluent easterners summering in the Evergreen area.  The first regularly scheduled rodeos started in 1935 becoming a yearly professional rodeo in 1947, attracting big-name national rodeo competitors traveling the PRCA circuit. 

One of the highlights to be seen on Evergreen Rodeo Weekend is the Evergreen Rodeo Drill Team, known as the Rocky Mountain Renegades.  In the last 7 years, Denise Schupp, a mountain area native and resident, has refined the drill team into sought after performers, representing Evergreen and the Evergreen Rodeo all over the state.  Denise states, “It (the Evergreen Rodeo) is an important part of the heritage of Evergreen and we are thrilled to be a piece of that history.  It combines my greatest passions – Evergreen, horses and drill team.” 

Denise has passionately spent a lot of time bringing the team to the next level of professionalism to ride in several performances throughout the year and all over Colorado.  With the help of the team, she has upgraded the costumes to give variety and a professional appearance as well as changed the choreography and music every year while constantly making improvements along the way.  The team practices for 2-3 hours weekly, starting in January and running through September in various locations depending on the weather.

Drill teams are a lifelong pursuit for Denise.  She joined Westernaires in 1972 when she was 9 years old and rode with them for 10 years.  She performed with Westernaires for 5 years at the National Western Stock Show Rodeo and eventually graduated as Captain of the Varsity team at Stock Show 1982.   From there Denise has served as a coach for Westernaires riders for a total of 24 years. She was also a paid consultant to other drill teams in Colorado and Wyoming to help them create teams, drills, and all of the other logistics.   She joined the Evergreen Rodeo Association in 2011 and rode with their drill team that was performing at the time.  The President of the Rodeo Association had heard of her experience riding and coaching and wisely asked her to take over the leadership and be the manager/coach of the struggling team. The is her 8th year riding in the Evergreen Rodeo with the drill team and 7th year as the manager and coach.

Most, but not all of the drill team riders, are alumni of Westernaires, have a drill riding background and vary in ages from 19-56.  The team has varied yearly from 13-22 riders, 20 being ideal. This year there are 18 riders who live in Brighton, Parker, Westminster, Littleton, Sedalia, Castle Rock, Bailey, Conifer, Indian Hills and Evergreen.  All riders own and care for their own horses or borrow from others on the team.  There are even two sets of sisters and one set of brothers on the team. 

No to be forgotten is the indispensable ‘ground crew’ that help with everything behind the scenes.  Made up of spouses, significant others, parents, and others that help with costume sewing and repair, flag sewing, photography, first aid, mixing our music, and working in the paddock area running the gates and handling our flags. 

In addition to performing at the Evergreen Rodeo every year, they perform at the Roof Top Rodeo in Estes Park, the Boulder County Rodeo Ballet on Horseback, the Park County in Fairplay, the Little Britches Rodeo in Evergreen, the Rocky Mountain Horse Expo, and Zuma’s Rescue Ranch black-tie fundraiser.  This year they will also be performing at the Denver Polo Club for their “Polo, Puppies and the Prince” fundraiser in August on their polo grounds! Additionally, the drill team has ridden in the National Western Stock Show parade for the past 7 years.

When can you see the devoted Rocky Mountain Renegades Evergreen Rodeo Weekend?!  They will be near the head of the parade through Downtown Evergreen carrying sponsor flags from local businesses.  At the rodeo performances, they will ride 2 drills in the pre-show, the Grand Entry in the opening performances, and an intermission performance drill in the middle of the rodeo on both Saturday and Sunday. 

Tickets on sale now at evergreenrodeo.com!

Rodeo Weekend Schedule –:

Saturday, June 15, 2019

10 AM – Parade

3 PM – Gates Open

3:30 PM – Preshow

5 PM – Rodeo

Sunday, June 16, 2019

12 PM – Gates Open

12:30 PM – Preshow

2 PM – Rodeo

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!  Be a part of the fun and dust off your cowboy hat and boots!  There are many volunteer positions available to help put on this incredible weekend of fun!  Contact Marty Unger at skymoma79@hotmail.com or 303-204-6642.  Heather McWilliams © 2019.